Yarrowia lipolytica

Desired yeast in the industry

more information

Yarrowia lipolytica gets its name from the Dutch researcher David Yarrow who discovered it, and its preference for eating all kinds of lipids (fatty substances). This yeast is widespread in nature: it has been recovered from such diverse places as human finger nails, rancid margarine and kerosene spills in the soil.

Yarrowia lipolytica gets its name from the Dutch researcher David Yarrow who discovered it, and its preference for eating all kinds of lipids (fatty substances). This yeast is widespread in nature: it has been recovered from such diverse places as human finger nails, rancid margarine and kerosene spills in the soil.

chubby chum 

Like many other yeasts, Y. lipolytica cell look oval to elongated through the microscope. These yeasts not only grow well on fatty substances, they can also store them very efficiently. Up to 54% of the weight of the cell can consist of oils and fats.

stevia – from plant to yeast

Stevia is a sweetener derived from stevia plants. Unlike normal sugars, it contains no calories. Therefore they do not make you fat, and they are not bad for your teeth. The sweetness comes from so-called steviol glycosides. The stevia plant (Stevia rebaudiana) contains more than 70 different types of sweeteners. These substances are up to 300 times sweeter than normal sugar. Unfortunately, stevia also has a bitter aftertaste. Due to the low yield per plant, it is very difficult to meet the growing demand for stevia only with plants. However, with yeasts and fermentation, steviol glycosides can be made on a large scale. The genes from the stevia plant that are responsible for the production of the sweeteners are placed in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica. By building in the plant production route in the yeast, Y. lipolytica now produces the tastiest stevia without a bitter aftertaste for large-scale use.